Self Portrait in coloured pencil

Friday, 20 April 2018

Girl in Profile


Girl in Profile

I have been enjoying painting this portrait of a girl in profile in oil on canvas. She has a very elegant nose. 
I have a bit of a thing about noses. Blame my mother for that. She had a slender Roman nose and she was proud of it. She would tilt her head and show it off, saying she was glad she didn’t have a snub nose. In case you are wondering, I have a cross between her nose and my father’s and I am very happy with it.
I took a lot of reference photos of the girl, but I had to reject all the full face ones because she had her eyes screwed up against the sun. 
I have finished the girl’s face, and last time I worked on the portrait I started her clothes. I would have liked to paint her hair, but I have to wait for paint to dry because I will need to rest my hand on her face and I don’t want to smudge it. Obviously. That is why I only painted the left side of her jacket. I don’t want a red hand when it is time to work on her portrait again.
I still have to finish her neck and paint her hand, which is resting on the back of a chair. They will wait until after I have finished her hair.



Friday, 13 April 2018

Lady in Sunglasses 2


Lady in Sunglasses 2

The Lady in Sunglasses is beginning to show her lovely friendly character. 
You may be thinking that I have indicated her eyes, but I can’t see her eyes at all in the reference photograph. I can only see myself and my camera reflected on the lenses and I am not going to paint that.
No, she hasn’t got a big earlobe. That will become her earring. 
I am still working on 10 portraits at once. I paint a bit more on three or four paintings a day. I have to rest my hand on the canvas because my arm and hand are weak due to polio. That is why I paint from the top left to the bottom right so I don’t smear the oil paint - except when I do it on purpose of course. If I need to go back over a higher part of the painting, I have to leave it to dry for a day or two. 
Meanwhile, I am ready to set up my next 10 portraits. There is a portrait of a deerhound calling to me ...



Friday, 6 April 2018

Brighteyes


Brighteyes

This portrait of a little boy, in oil on canvas, is coming along nicely. 
I started to paint his blonde hair full of different shades. I was mainly using gold ochre and raw umber. The hair was fairly dry by this morning so I thought I should put in the highlights. Then I had an idea to make the colour more subtle by mixing in transparent white. I had never used transparent white before. It is definitely different from ordinary white oil paint. So I painted transparent white over all his hair and I am leaving it to dry to see what happens.
Talking of hair, after I put him on the picture shelf to dry, I took down the portrait of his girl cousin who has an elaborate plaited hairstyle. I didn’t take a photo of her portrait because it hasn’t yet got sufficient nose or mouth to stop her looking like an alien. I don’t want anyone to see her looking like that. 
I was puzzling about how to paint her hair, when I remembered that my hairdresser was coming today. So I left the girl’s portrait on the easel and my lovely hairdresser, Sue, explained how the hair should look in my painting! I hope to post the finished result next week.
I am so lucky with the technical help I am getting with these portraits.


Friday, 30 March 2018

Walter


Walter

I am enjoying painting Walter’s portrait. It has come along nicely since I started to go over all the oil on canvas portraits using tones of brown ochre and using hints of Venetian red rather than the more orangey light red. 
It won’t be long before I have to paint in his moustache. That will be an interesting challenge.
His clothes are complicated too.
I am continuing to have ten portraits on the go, all sitting on picture shelves. I have two new ones ready to start as soon as I have space to put them. 

I mentioned last week that I had been very interested in the Civilisations episode about religious painting. 
I am a Nichiren Buddhist. Nichiren Daishonin inscribed a scroll with calligraphy of which he wrote: "I, Nichiren, have inscribed my life in sumi ink”. We Nichiren Buddhists enshrine a copy of this scroll in our homes and don’t generally go in for images of Buddhas. 
In another letter, Nichiren Daishonin wrote that he was ”cursed with an ugly appearance”. He had a couple of portraits painted during his lifetime that show he was not a handsome man but they do portray a kind man. 
After his death, statues were erected, and each one is more beautified than the last. 
I have noticed that beautification is common when it comes to painting religious figures.









Friday, 23 March 2018

Lady in Sunglasses


Lady in Sunglasses

This is not going to be the easiest oil on canvas portrait that I am going to do. I can’t see the lady’s eyes behind her sunglasses. But I can see her charming smile.
The sunglasses are making some interesting shadows and reflections on her cheeks (which I haven’t painted yet). Meanwhile, I have been concentrating on blending the highlights. And now she has a mouth and an indication of where her teeth are. Teeth take a lot of blending to get them to sit back in a mouth nicely. There is nothing worse than a portrait with shining white teeth!

I am sorry that this is such a short post. I was going to write about last night’s episode of Civilisations on BBC2. It was very interesting on the subject of religious art. But I fell asleep this afternoon and I can’t write a quick note on such an important topic. It will take a few edits. Look out for it soon.


Friday, 16 March 2018

Baby Has Eyes


Baby Has Eyes

I have been working hard painting this week. I spend about an hour on each portrait then I put them on the shelf to dry. 
I have changed my favourite brand of paint to Talens Rembrandt oil colours. I bought a selection of them and discovered that a very good cool skin tone is brown ochre mixed with lots of white, and a touch of light red oxide for rosy cheeks. My original selection didn’t include raw umber, so I ordered that, and some transparent oxide brown to try out.
Once I had the raw umber I was able to paint the baby’s eyes. They are a hazel brown and the rest of my browns were reddish. No good at all!
His eyes aren’t quite in the right place because I couldn’t rest my hand on the painting to do them - the paint was wet.
I would get more done (maybe) if I didn’t spend a lot of time picking tiny cat hairs out of the paint. I have tried tweezers but I can’t find any precise enough. I sometimes manage to scrape them off with a small palette knife if I find them before they are embedded in the paint.
Does anyone know a good solution? 



Friday, 9 March 2018

Viewing Art


Viewing Art

I watched Civilisations on BBC 2 last night. This episode was relevant to me and my portraits as it was about what the viewer brings to the depiction of the human face. Mary Beard had some pertinent comments to make about how taste in art is influenced by culture. 

When I paint or draw a portrait I am very conscious of the relationship of my client to the subject, and, if my client wants a portrait of themself, I try to be aware of how they want to be viewed by their friends. 
It took me a while to decide which portrait to choose to illustrate this, and finally, I decided that the portrait of Tyla would be a good example. 
I had met Tyla and knew that she was a dog of great character. She had a lot to say in rather growly tones when she greeted me and she was so much loved. As it was a surprise birthday present, she was brought to my house so I could take reference photos. I wanted her to face the window for the good light, but there was a door behind her and my two dogs were snuffling under that door. Fortunately I had some bits of chicken, so I was able to attract her attention, but not fully, as even when she had her nose pointed in my (ie the chicken’s) direction, her gaze was still over her shoulder to check on the snuffles. 
I wanted to capture the look of a dog gazing adoringly at her guardian. I know that look well as I have dogs myself. So I was able to get the look I wanted. 
As Tyla has a wonderful brindled coat it took me much longer to paint than I hoped and I missed the deadline of the birthday. So I scanned the unfinished portrait and made a birthday card of it. It was seriously unfinished but it was still recognised. I was told about it. He exclaimed "That’s my dog!" So I am sure I succeeded.
As I mostly paint or draw family portraits, I aim for an affectionate expression. It isn’t too difficult if they are with their family like children accompanied by their mother. But I remember one occasion when I was struggling to get usable photos of two young sisters until I was inspired to give them the camera and ask them to photograph each other. 
I have been commissioned to do mostly children or pets of recent years. But I have always enjoyed painting adult portraits too.